DISCOVER

 

DISCOVER YOUR CATHEDRAL

HOLY TRINITY cathedral is open to visitors
monday-thursday 10am-1pm

THINGS TO DO AND SEE

East and West Nave Windows
East and West Nave Windows

Click link below to view the full information on the Shane Cotton and Robert Ellis windows in the Cathedral Nave.

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Bishop Selwyn Chapel
Bishop Selwyn Chapel

This remarkable Chapel, with its three walls of glass and curved gilded ceiling is a modern masterpiece. Designed by Auckland architects, Fearon Hay, this versatile venue offers a sacred place to enjoy the views out through the historic oaks to the volcanic cone of One Tree Hill. (Image: Patrick Reynolds)

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The Font
The Font

Anne Robinson’s glass baptismal font was cast in four separate pillars, and glued in place with a stainless steel cruciform inset in the bowl. Dedicated in 2009, it captures the colours of the stained glass from the nearby windows.

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St Stephen's Chapel
St Stephen's Chapel

Located in Judge Street, Parnell, St Stephen's Chapel, built in 1857 and seating only 45 people, is a well-loved landmark above Tamaki Drive. Popular for weddings, it is still used for regular 9am Sunday Services.

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Labyrinth
Labyrinth

The outdoor labyrinth, between St Mary’s and Parnell Road was designed by Dr Jacky Bowring, and is a gift from the Kelliher Trust. Children love running around its sunken curves, and all are able to use it as a contemplative tool to offer a reflective moment out from the pace of regular life.

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The Rose Window
The Rose Window

The Rose Window in the Chancel is the work of the English artist, Carl Edwards, and symbolises the Trinity - Father (eye), Son (cross) and Holy Spirit (dove). The traditional Alpha and Omega symbols are also incorporated.

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Neil Dawson Cross
Neil Dawson Cross

The 8.3m-high cross of the Bishop Selwyn Chapel is located in the Trinity Garden, and situated on the midline of the Cathedral. Tilted heavenward, this inspirational sculpture is the work of prominent New Zealand sculptor, Neil Dawson.

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St Mary's-in-Holy Trinity
St Mary's-in-Holy Trinity

This Grade 1 historic building was first built at the end of the 19th century. It was moved to its present location from the other side of Parnell Road in 1982. Photos of this move are inside the porch. Look for the bookstand on the pulpit made by the “mouseman”.

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Stained Glass Windows of the Nave
Stained Glass Windows of the Nave

The Great Window at the rear of the Nave, designed by Nigel Brown, is said to be the largest expanse of stained glass in the Southern Hemisphere. The windows have a Maori/Polynesian side and a European side, with the risen Christ in the centre crowned by a seven-petalled flower depicting the seven days of Creation. Please follow the link below for further information about our East and West Nave windows.

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Light a Candle
Light a Candle

Light a candle on the votive candle-holder located by the Marsden Chapel and offer a prayer for yourself, or for someone who you love or who needs your prayers. This holder was designed to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II and dedicated by The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams during his visit in 2012.

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Cathedral Organ
Cathedral Organ

Marvel at the new Cathedral organ – completed in May 2017. It is the largest pipe organ in New Zealand and the largest Cathedral organ in the Southern Hemisphere. It was designed, built and installed by Nicholson & Co, from the UK.

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The Brewer Garden
The Brewer Garden

Enjoy a picnic under the shade of chestnut tree beside the historic church of St Mary’s

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Marsden Chapel Stained Glass
Marsden Chapel Stained Glass

The Marsden Chapel is named for the Reverend Samuel Marsden who conducted the first Christian service on New Zealand soil during Christmas Day 1814. Within the chapel are five windows by John Baker, depicting Our Lord’s Ascension, the Day of the Pentecost, the Stoning of St Stephen, the Baptism of the Ethiopian, and the Institution of Holy Communion.

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Mountain Fountain
Mountain Fountain

On the Cathedral’s forecourt sits the “Mountain Fountain”. Designed by Terry Stringer, this fountain originally stood in Aotea Square, but was moved to the Cathedral site in 2010. At night, the lighting dramatically showcases the sculpture against the Cathedral’s complementary roofline.

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The John Wilson Gallery
The John Wilson Gallery

Open to the public, this exciting new gallery space is located in the undercroft of the Cathedral. The Gallery features nine works on loan from the Wallace Art Trust and was made possible through a generous bequest from the late John Wilson and other donations. Feel free to ask our friendly Welcomers if you need directions! Image courtesy of artsdiary.co.nz 2019

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cathedral artist in residence

We are delighted to welcome back Karen Sewell (top left image) to the Cathedral as our Artist in Residence. Karen creates her artworks in and around the Cathedral and is inspired by her surroundings.

The Cathedral has had a long association with the arts historically commissioning artworks as it was built and in recent times establishing the John Wilson Gallery, hosting art installations, and participating in Artweek Auckland. The artist in residence compliments these initiatives, extends our involvement in the arts, and provides benefits for the Cathedral community and the artist.

A visual artist graduating with a Master of Fine Arts (with Honours) in 2016 from Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design, Karen is interested in the intersection of art and spiritual experience. She aspires to create artworks that activate spaces for viewer/participants to be able to experience liminal moments of awareness of the unknown, an awakening to wonder, or numinous experiences. Karen works across media including sculpture, installation, painting, drawing and photography, specialising in installation practice. 

In 2021 Karen worked on several significant projects including a solo show Numinous Spheres at Northart Gallery (top right image).

 

Karen has been invited to exhibit at the Venice Biennale in 2022. Luminary exhibition will show at the Palazzo Bembo on the Grand Canal (bottom image). This will be Karen’s first international exhibition and is an incredible achievement. 

A sculptural installation will tour several NZ cathedrals and churches in mid-2022.

 

www.karensewell.net 

Karen Sewell.jpg
Numinous Spheres, Solo show at Northart Gallery 2021.jpg
Palazzo Bembo, Venice. Luminary exhibition, Venice Biennale 2022.jpg

How to get to Holy Trinity Cathedral

Holy Trinity Cathedral is located at 446 Parnell Road, Parnell, Auckland.

 

By Bus

The green Inner Link bus service stops on Parnell Road outside Holy Trinity Cathedral on both clock-wise (bus stop number 7194) and anticlockwise routes (bus stop number 7193).

 

The orange Outer Link bus service stops on Parnell Road outside Holy Trinity Cathedral on both clock-wise (bus stop number 7194) and anticlockwise routes (bus stop number 7193).

 

The 703 bus service from Britomart to Portland Road stops at 17 Brighton Road (bus stop 7658). From this stop, it is a short walk to the Cathedral at the top road.

 

The 703 bus service from Portland Road to Britomart stops at 16 St Stephen’s Ave (bus stop 7665) - from here cross the road to the Cathedral opposite.

The Hop-on Hop-off Tours also stop at Holy Trinity Cathedral. For more information, visit their website here.

 

By Train

Southern and Western Line trains stop at the Parnell railway station on Cheshire Street. From the station, take a short walk to Parnell Rise, and then up the hill to the Cathedral.
 

By Car

Holy Trinity Cathedral has car parking available to those attending services and events.  Access to the carpark is from Parnell Road. There is no charge to those attending Sunday services. However, car parking charges apply to those using this carpark for weddings, funerals, and all other events. A pay and display meter is located on the left-hand side as you enter from Parnell Road.

Cathedral plan updated 21 March 22.png

Parking

The Cathedral car park has 112 spaces and is accessible from Parnell Road, behind St Mary's-in-Holy Trinity. There are parking meters located at either end of the car park. Parking rates are $6 for 4 hours, or $10 for all day. Payments can be paid by paywave-enabled cards at the machines. Parking hours are Monday - Sunday, 6am - midnight.

Disabled parking is situated in the small carpark located directly in front of the Cathedral on Parnell Road, and also in the main carpark accessed from Parnell Road entrance.

There are several P60 parking places on Parnell Road in front of St Mary’s, with more parking sometimes available in adjacent streets - Cathedral Place, Birdwood Crescent, St Stephen’s Avenue and Brighton Road.

Toilets 

Men's and women's toilets are located on the right-hand side of the Cathedral crossing/stage area before the Chancel. The disabled facilities can be accessed using the ramp along the right-hand side of the Nave and can be found in the porch of the Patteson Entrance, just past the men's and women's toilets.

 

Additional men's and women's toilets (with baby-changing facilities) can be found downstairs along the John Wilson Gallery, accessible from the Visitors' Centre. There is an additional disabled toilet (with baby-changing facilities) next to the kitchen area in the Visitors' Centre.

selwyn's vision project

In 1843, Bishop Selwyn purchased the land in Parnell, Auckland, upon which Holy Trinity Cathedral sits.  His vision was to build a great cathedral that would become “a centre for educational, social, charitable and missionary work”.