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Top things to see and do at Holy Trinity Cathedral

Click the images below for a full description of each of the top things to see and do at Holy Trinity Cathedral.

Cathedral visiting hours

 

Monday - Sunday

Summer: 10am - 3pm

Winter: 10am - 3pm

All are welcome to attend Cathedral services, click below to view our service times.

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Guided Group tours

Guided tours - including the Cathedral, St Mary's and Bishop Selwyn Chapel - typically take around one hour. They include the history of the Cathedral from 1841, information about the magnificent art work in the Cathedral from some of New Zealand's leading artists, and the place of the Cathedral in the community today.

For guided group tours, we ask for a donation of $5 per person.

To book a guided group tour, please contact Mariana Nordmark, by clicking the button below.

history, art and Architecture

Holy Trinity Cathedral is the Anglican ‘Mother Church’ of the Auckland Diocese – which includes the area from North Cape, down and across the Hauraki Plains to the Coromandel Peninsula in the east, and south to the regions surrounding the Waikato River. 

Our Cathedral reflects the Three Tikanga Church of the Province of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.  In addition to the Cathedra, the seat of the Bishop of Auckland, we also have chairs for the Bishops of Te Pihopatanga O Te Tai Tokerau and of the Diocese of Polynesia in New Zealand.

 

Situated on the ridge of the suburb of Parnell, the land on which the Cathedral sits was purchased by Bishop Selwyn in 1843.  The foundation stone for the Cathedral was laid over 100 years later in 1957.   The Chancel, built in a neo-Gothic style, was completed in 1973 and also offers the Marsden Chapel as a separate worship space.  In 1982, the historic wooden church of St Mary’s was moved across the road to its present site adjacent to the Chancel.  The contemporary Nave of Holy Trinity was opened in 1995, and the Cathedral was completed in 2016 with the opening of the Bishop Selwyn Chapel.  

Daily services at Holy Trinity offer all an opportunity to gather and worship in God’s presence.  

The Cathedral opens its precinct daily and welcomes all those who wish to visit to enjoy its varied and inspiring architecture and remarkable works of art including stained glass windows, glass font, fountain, outdoor cross, furniture, votive candle holder, and labyrinth – all by notable New Zealand artists.

The Cathedral is also a performing arts venue within the city of Auckland, and is used regularly by a wide range of performing artists, of all genres.

How to get to Holy Trinity Cathedral

Holy Trinity Cathedral is located at 446 Parnell Road, Parnell, Auckland.

 

By Bus

The green Inner Link bus service stops on Parnell Road outside Holy Trinity Cathedral on both clock-wise (bus stop number 7194) and anticlockwise routes (bus stop number 7193).

 

The orange Outer Link bus service stops on Parnell Road outside Holy Trinity Cathedral on both clock-wise (bus stop number 7194) and anticlockwise routes (bus stop number 7193).

 

The 703 bus service from Britomart to Portland Road stops at 17 Brighton Road (bus stop 7658). From this stop, it is a short walk to the Cathedral at the top road.

 

The 703 bus service from Portland Road to Britomart stops at 16 St Stephen’s Ave (bus stop 7665) - from here cross the road to the Cathedral opposite.

The Hop-on Hop-off Tours also stop at Holy Trinity Cathedral. For more information, visit their website here.

 

By Train

Southern and Western Line trains stop at the Parnell railway station on Cheshire Street. From the station, take a short walk to Parnell Rise, and then up the hill to the Cathedral.
 

By Car

Holy Trinity Cathedral has car parking available to those attending services and events.  Access to the carpark is from Brighton Road, and from Parnell Road. There is no charge to those attending Sunday services. However, car parking charges apply to those using this carpark for weddings, funerals, and all other events. Pay and display meters are located on the right as you enter the Brighton Road entrance, and just past the end of St Mary’s-in-Holy Trinity Cathedral from the Parnell Road entrance.

Parking

The Cathedral car park has 150 spaces and is accessible from either Parnell Road, behind St Mary's-in-Holy Trinity, or from Brighton Road. There are parking meters located at either end of the car park. Parking rates are $6 for 4 hours, or $10 for all day. Payments can be paid by paywave-enabled cards at the machines. Parking hours are Monday - Sunday, 6am - midnight.

Disabled parking is situated in the small carpark located directly in front of the Cathedral on Parnell Road, and also in the main carpark accessed from Parnell Road entrance.

There are several P60 parking places on Parnell Road in front of St Mary’s, with more parking sometimes available in adjacent streets - Cathedral Place, Birdwood Crescent, St Stephen’s Avenue and Brighton Road.

Toilets 

Men's and women's toilets are located on the right-hand side of the Cathedral crossing/stage area before the Chancel. Access to the disabled facilities can be achieved using the ramp along the right-hand side of the Nave and the disabled toilet can be found in the porch of the Patteson Entrance, just past the men's and women's toilets.

 

Additional men's and women's toilets (with baby-changing facilities) can be found downstairs along the John Wilson Gallery, accessible from the Visitors' Centre. There is an additional disabled toilet (with baby-changing facilities) next to he kitchen area in the Visitors' Centre.

 
 
 
 
 

+64 (0)9 303 9500

office@holy-trinity.org.nz

 

446 Parnell Road

Parnell

Auckland 1052

New Zealand

 

PO Box 37-148

Parnell

Auckland 1151

New Zealand

CONTACT US

Cathedral visiting hours

Monday-Sunday: 10am - 3pm

Office hours

Monday-Friday: 9am - 3pm

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@2016 by Holy Trinity Cathedral. Proudly created by DESIGNS + CO

The Font

Anne Robinson’s glass baptismal font was cast in four separate pillars, and glued in place with a stainless steel cruciform inset in the bowl. Dedicated in 2009, it captures the colours of the stained glass from the nearby windows.